Monday, November 14, 2011

More Robsten Interviews

Kristen's Interview with On The Red Carpet



Via mfoc Via Robsten Dreams

Kristen Interview with "Blick" (Switzerland)

Oscar winner Arthur Cohn forewarned me: "She's an excellent actress and brilliant, but very shy." He's speaking of Kristen Stewart. He has to know it, after all he discovered her as a young girl. Meanwhile she's become a world star thanks to "Twilight". But the fame hasn't changed her personally. At the meeting it turns out that Arthur prepared me appropriately for meeting Kristen. It fits completely: She's not the one who simply bubbles away, answers no question till she's weighed the words [in German: till it (the question) passed the gold balance test]. Before she opens her mouth, the brain has to give the "Okay" first.
To her "I don't like to be a star"-image the Chanel dress and the stilettos with the golden heels and the platform soles don't really fit. A confession to the show business: "I will be comfortable in a certain hoodie of mine no matter what mood I am in. ... And I need pockets, 'cause if I carried a bag, I'd lose it purposely."

For a shy being you go really hard in the sex scenes in Breaking Dawn. The word is that some r-rated scenes were cut.
It wasn't that bad. Indeed there was only a small circle of people admitted when Rob and me were filmed in bed. But we didn't do anything what would be r-rated.

The sex with Rob was simulated. Did you still feel nervous to do "it" in front of the camera?
Honestly, at the beginning I felt really strange. But I don't belong to those people who need a drink before such scenes. At the end it's a job you're doing. And besides, I don't drink while working.

On the other hand, your fans will be needing a sip to calm down when your Twilight-baby is born. Will you tell us one secret: Does Bella die at birth?
I'm not quite sure. Her heart stops beating, but her soul is still in her.

Religious spectators could feel sensitive about the resurrection in the style of Twilight.
I have no idea what the church says to this.

One can well imagine that the audience is shocked about your physical appearance in the birth scene: "My god, Kristen's appearance is only skin and bones!" How much weight did you have to lose for this scene?

Source Translation: adorablekstew from Robsteners Via Robsten Dreams


Rob Interview with The Scotsman

Robert Pattinson is bewildered by just how famous he is. As the Twilight saga draws to a close, the actor, a curious mix of charm and awkwardness, offers a glimpse into his surreal world

“I was on the 209 bus last week,” I blurt to Robert Pattinson by way of an introduction. He looks wary. It’s fair enough. We’re in Los Angeles, in a room on the 10th floor of the Four Seasons hotel and the 209 is a bus that trundles through south west London. The reason I mention it is because it stops in Barnes, the leafy suburb where Pattinson grew up and where his parents still live. It’s a village, really, quaint and terribly English, peppered with ye olde pubs patronised by older gents in red socks and corduroys, the casual attire of the retired banker. It’s most definitely not Beverly Hills.

“That’s the bus that goes to where my parents live,” he says, looking confused. “And it’s the bus I took to my prep school in Sheen.”

I didn’t mention the 209 to freak Pattinson out, although I’m quickly learning how skittish he is. I wasn’t trying to be quirky, or to ingratiate myself; I was aiming to just say something ordinary, something simple and real, because it’s not difficult to work out that simple and real are not major features of Pattinson’s life. After all, he’s Edward Cullen, brooding vampire hero of the Twilight Saga, the cinematic juggernaut that started in 2008 and, with a release each year since, draws to a close with Breaking Dawn, the first part of which is out this month, followed by the second and final part, already shot but to be released in November 2012.

Before Twilight, Pattinson, 25, was anonymous. Now, there isn’t really anywhere he can go without being recognised. Pie shops in Yorkshire, karaoke bars in Texas – there’s no escape from Edward Cullen and the millions of fans who want their necks nibbled, mothers who’d like their daughters signed (really) or at the very least a photograph to put on Facebook.

It’s the reason Pattinson lives in hotels, to stay one step ahead.

“It’s good to be able to escape,” he says. “But I’ve started to feel recently that having a home would be good. You do kind of lose yourself when you’re living out of bags the whole time. But if I had a home I’d worry about it too much. And I hate spending money. If I could find a house for free that’d be amazing.”

He laughs and then looks serious again. It’s typical Pattinson delivery, a kind of subdued stream of consciousness in which he talks himself in and out of things, then relies on humour to lighten things up, not always convincingly.

“I rented a house in LA last year,” he says. “It was great for ages and then people found out about it and so there were people outside all the time. I had to go away for work and people were going up to it and taking pictures of themselves beside the house. People are crazy.”

You don’t really have to have seen any of the Twilight movies to know what they’re about. Based on Stephenie Meyer’s blockbuster novels, the movies tell the tale of the fated romance between Edward, a 110-year-old vampire who looks forever 17, and Bella (Kristen Stewart) who is human. The first three parts that have been released since 2008 have made nearly $2billion. They’ve also made Pattinson into a global star.

The hotel corridor is dotted with more women with clipboards than I can count. They stand in pairs, marking things down (what I wonder?). Outside the room in which I find Pattinson, sitting in a corner, looking as inconspicuous as a six foot movie star can possibly look, dressed down in jeans and Converse, with a scuzzy looking T-shirt underneath a canvas jacket, there are two burly security guards with inscrutable facial expressions and jackets that are slightly straining at the button.

“There are more organisers here than we have on the set,” Pattinson says. “Having security walking up and down the corridor as if something’s going to happen is freaking me out.”

It’s no wonder he’s nervous. He’s had some dicey experiences. The last time he was in London (promoting Water for Elephants, in which he starred with Reese Witherspoon) he was followed by one particular photographer for the whole week. It was odd, he says, and it got dangerous.

“In America there are loads of people who follow me around at the same time but this was just one guy who was just on me the whole time I was there. He was obsessed. I got in a taxi and he jumped off his motorbike and got in. He just opened the door and jumped in but he had a motorbike helmet on and I literally thought I was going to be assassinated.”

I check to see if he’s joking. He kind of is, but not entirely.

“It was the craziest thing, the weirdest thing that’s ever happened. And the cab driver just drove off because he was so freaked out as well. The guy fell out. It was like an action movie.”

It’s not hard to understand then why Pattinson is circumspect. You would be if you were the subject of an app called “Where’s Robert?”, which details your every move for fans to follow. But there’s something else too. In every interview Pattinson’s ever given, at least as much attention is focused on his meteoric rise to fame and all its trappings as the acting that actually got him there. It’s impossible not to dwell on it, partly because it’s so extreme and partly because he seems so bewildered by it, so genuinely uncomfortable and ill-suited to the whole thing.

The question is: how someone as self-conscious, awkward and self-deprecating has ended up starting his movie career in one massive movie franchise (Pattinson was Cedric Diggory in two Harry Potter films) and the leading man in another?

The way Pattinson tells it, it’s all been a bit of an accident. He started going along to Barnes Theatre Club because his dad told him he’d meet girls there. Then there was a stint as a model (his mum worked for a modelling agency) but he was “rubbish” and didn’t get any jobs. He was 17 when he landed the role of Diggory in The Goblet of Fire after having fallen asleep in the queue outside the audition room. (Being very relaxed seems to work for Pattinson. He took half a Valium before his audition for the first Twilight movie.) There was a slight blip after the Potter films when he landed a role in a play at the Royal Court but was fired before the opening night, but not long after Twilight came along and that was that.

There’s no doubt he feels lucky, if slightly incredulous, that things have worked out the way they have, but he reckons that having “fallen into” his career makes it harder for him to cope with all the scrutiny and attention that goes with his level of fame.

“At least if you’ve been striving for it your whole life then you’ve got that justification – this is what it is and this is what I’ve wanted. Maybe then you wouldn’t feel disillusioned with it. I guess the people who really work for it have this part of their persona which is just ready to go when they become famous. When they walk into a room and everyone turns round they’re like ‘yeah, they should be looking at me’. When I walk into a room and everyone turns round I feel exactly as I did before Twilight, which is like ‘what’s happening? This is weird.’ ”

But surely he must’ve wanted it a bit?

“I wanted something,” he says with a shrug.

Pattinson may be unsuited to being a heartthrob temperamentally, but when it comes to how he looks, it’s a different story. His cheekbones jut from his face in an almost unseemly way. Heavy brows give him a brooding intensity (his looks were described as Byronic by a producer of the first Twilight movie) and his mouth sits in a permanent, natural pout. Vanity Fair dubbed him the most handsome man in the world. How funny then that when Pattinson was announced as Edward Cullen, there was outrage. Fans of the books went crazy – they thought he was too ugly, “repulsive” they shrieked on internet fansites. Then he appeared, all pale and intense and they melted. Actually, that makes them sound a bit too passive. They didn’t melt as much as coalesce into a baying mob who couldn’t get enough of tragic, tortured Edward.

“I guess I got accepted, sort of,” he says squirming. “The reason people like it is because it’s in their imaginations. It means that the performances don’t really matter, it’s more about whether the face looks right. That warrants a certain degree of acceptance, even reluctant acceptance. It’s just a kind of brainwashing.” He laughs nervously.

Pattinson always has an explanation that deflects attention away from him. He takes modesty, ramps it up with inconsistent eye contact, an endless supply of self-effacing anecdotes and an air of utter bafflement that creates a genuine awkwardness. I don’t care about the £12million pay cheque (the amount he’s reportedly earned for the Twilight movies) it’s hard not to sympathise.

But not everyone does. Some people find the awkwardness off-putting. In a group or being interviewed on camera his body language is a study in self-consciousness, he folds himself up as if he’s trying to disappear. His chat can be similarly tricky. He sometimes laughs a little longer than he should and his stories have a tendency to peter out. One to one, he’s more relaxed, but it’s not easy.

And, of course, there’s also resentment. Either people are angered by the popularity of Twilight or they’re annoyed that someone could just stumble into a career like Pattinson’s. Earlier in the day, before I meet him one on one, I overhear a plump Italian journalist with Kevin Keegan curls demand of him, “What happened to your hair?”

It’s true, Pattinson’s hair was looking a bit odd, shaved on one side with long strands on the other. It looked homemade. But, still, the question was rude. And yet Pattinson’s reaction couldn’t have been more meek.

“It was for the last movie [Cosmopolis] I did,” he explained. “I had to have loads of bits randomly cut into so then I was going to shave my head and then I just shaved that bit and decided I kind of liked it.” He shrugged and laughed awkwardly. “I decided to just leave it.”

You’d think at some level Pattinson’s success might have made him a little big headed. In a way, it’s hard not to wish it had. Isn’t that at least part of what being a movie star is about – ego?

Pattinson says he was cockier before Twilight, when he could be who he wanted, say whatever he wanted because no one knew who he was.

“When no one knows who you are you can walk into a room and say anything. You can say you’re the greatest person in the world and no one can say you’re not because they don’t know you. But now they can say ‘I know you, why are you trying to be this? Why are you trying to be that?’ The best thing you can do is stay hidden.”

But how do you stay hidden from 30,000 fans who turn up to hear a 10-minute Q&A as they did at the Olympic Stadium in Munich? Or when you have to appear at Comic-Con and the queues are round the block? I wonder if he feels that people come to see him, or whether they want to see Edward?

“In some ways it helps to think that they’re coming to see Edward. But in other ways it’s saddening. It depends what mood I’m in. It’s a funny thing to see a crowd of people looking at you and knowing that they’re not actually seeing you at all, they’re just seeing whatever it is they imagine you to be.


“You can’t change. You can’t just suddenly decide to be different. I remember coming to LA before and I’d be a totally different person to who I was in London. I always used to look forward to coming over for three months of castings because I could just bullshit the whole time and feel really great about myself even though I wasn’t getting any jobs.” He laughs at the absurdity. “I got to meet all these really interesting people. But now, people have immediate preconceptions about me. I end up having the same conversation a lot. People assume there’s only one talking point.”

Suddenly you start to understand at least a part of the bond between Pattinson and his co-star Stewart: they’re Twilight survivors. Pattinson speaks about Stewart affectionately and he’s clearly full of admiration for her as an actor. Neither of them has ever said a word publicly about whether they are in a relationship despite endless speculation and photographs of them together all over the world. But why would they? Why would they give up something which, so far, they’ve managed to keep for themselves?

It’s a similar story with music. Pattinson is a talented musician and for a while he thought that music might be his career. He had a track on the first Twilight soundtrack. But ask him how it’s going now and he looks like he’d rather pull out his own teeth than talk about it.

“Erm, I’m just writing stuff. I don’t really know. It’s very easy to get labelled. I don’t really know how to go about the music stuff just now.”

Maybe his success as an actor has got in the way?

“Completely,” he says, looking sheepish. “For some reason everyone wants to shit on actors more than anyone else.”

To be fair, there can’t be much time for music. Since Pattinson finished shooting Breaking Dawn, he’s made Cosmopolis with David Cronenberg and Bel Ami, an adaptation of a Guy de Maupassant story of the same name, with Uma Thurman. Didn’t he want to have a break?

“The world moves so quickly now,” he says. “You’ve always got to have stuff lined up. Especially me. Anyone who got big in the last few years, the Twitter age, your shelf life is so short because people’s opinions change so quickly. You’ve got to give constant updates or announcements, even if the movie doesn’t exist, just to have something to announce.


“You’ve got to constantly change people’s perceptions. It’s like, ‘yeah, I’m playing a lesbian robot’ so that people don’t know what to think. If you leave it then it’s like ‘oh, it’s just that guy from Twilight’; it fossilises.”

But the problem for Pattinson is that with the work comes the promotion and even more attention and that’s when things get tricky. There’s no point fighting it, it’s just not his thing.

“The thing I’m most afraid of, because everything is pushing in that direction, is literally just making myself a product. As soon as you start doing Twitter and adverts and straying away what you started out doing and just being a personality, that’s when you get huge money but it’s also when you go crazy.”

Time’s up and to be honest, I almost feel relieved on Pattinson’s behalf. He’s survived another interview and now he can get on with trying to be invisible.

“I’ll think of you the next time I’m on the 209,” I tell him.

“You’ll probably see my mum,” he says. And laughs.

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 1 (12A) is on general release from 18 November.
Source scotsman Via twitter Via Robsten Dreams

Rob, Kristen and Taylor Interview with Manila Bulletin

LOS ANGELES – When Kristen Stewart, Taylor Lautner and Robert Pattinson met us in a Beverly Hills hotel one lovely afternoon, the three stars of “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn-Part 1” talked of their ever growing friendship, how they bonded when not filming, the two final parts of the popular franchise and what all this “Twilight” experience has done to them.

On doing Parts 1 and 2, the lovely Kristen, now 21, said, “I wanted to remember the experiences as something that happened to me rather than something that I made and you really rarely get that opportunity.”

In this movie, Bella and Edward get married and have their first vampire-human baby.

On doing the wedding and birthing scenes, Kristen revealed, “It’s funny comparing the wedding scene to the birth scene, the experience of it. They couldn’t have been more different. I cleared my head so successfully before I walked down the aisle that I just didn’t think. No choices were made, it just happened. As with the birth scene, I just wanted to push it further and further. I didn’t want to stop shooting it and that’s because reading the book is so viscerally grotesque. It hurts to read it but at the same time, the most beautiful thing is coming out of it. She is achieving all of what she’s dreamed of and it is literally summed up in what’s inside. It’s in the baby and obviously, it defines her character. She has been talking about being able to throw it all away. I will die for this. That’s a grand statement to make and so to see her get within an inch of that is as if she was not lying. She’s a machine. It was cool to play raw emotion that was so fundamental. Every human being can relate to it as if the role was very physical.”

On how close the three of them have become, Kristen disclosed, “We are so lucky to have each other in this. It’s funny. We don’t have the type of relationship that you find on sets that you know each other within a very particular context like only on the set of ‘Twilight.’ Every time I remember that I have not talked to Taylor in a while, it rather worries me. It shocks me going whoa, where is he?A perfect example was the other day when we put our hands in cement at the Hollywood Walk of Fame. I felt ridiculous looking down at my tiny hands. I was just thinking like God, I can’t believe this is happening and then you look to the right, you look to the left and it makes sense. Taylor and Robert are amazing. I couldn’t have done it without them. It would have just been a very different experience.”

In fact during breaks, Kristen who loves to cook, makes Taylor and Robert their favorite soups. “Taylor likes asparagus soup and Robert loves tortilla soup,” Kristen disclosed.

The charming 19-year-old Taylor confirmed, “The three of us are so close we are able to talk as friends. We have grown up together for the past four years and that has been a major help. It made things a lot easier.”

When not working, Taylor revealed that the three of them spend time together. “When we are on set, the mood is very light and we have a lot of fun together. Whenever we wrap, whatever time we have left over we will go out to eat.”

On doing “Breaking Dawn,” Taylor said, “This one deals with the same Jacob we’ve always seen before. He is immature; he is selfish. When he doesn’t get what he wants he pouts about it or handles it the wrong way. Throughout the movie, we see him grow. We see him make choices and make decisions that are more difficult. He is forced to mature and become a man in this one. By the end of it, something happens, the imprinting. He realizes why everything has been happening this way. He is not meant to be with Bella. We will be able to explore in Part 2 the outcome of all that.”

As for putting their imprints on the Hollywood’s Walk of Fame, Taylor revealed, “If I had to choose one moment within the past years that has been the most surreal, it would be that because I remember when I first moved here from Michigan when I was 11 years old. I walked down the Walk of Fame, looked at the stars and looked at the hand and footprints. It was just the coolest thing. I never thought ever when I was looking at those that I would actually be there one day. It’s kind of funny because I didn’t for some reason think it was going to be such an event when we did it. I thought the three of us were just going to show up and put our hands in some wet cement. But no, there was like thousands of fans there and helicopters. It made me nervous. I’m like oh, I don’t want to mess my hand print. What if I mess up, it’s going to be there forever. Then you have all the attention on top of that. My hands were shaking a little bit.”

As for Robert, 25, he talked of how frustrated he was of Edward’s behavior in Part 1. “I have never been really frustrated by Edward’s behavior in any of the other movies,” he confessed. “I remember reading the book and I got more and more disgusted by his passivity until the point where at the wedding, Jacob is having the first dance with Bella. I am like what is happening. This is totally crazy. But I understood it more after Bella gets pregnant. When you fall in love with someone, you are in a totally hopeless position. You feel you have no power at all. So as soon as she starts going off on her own journey, all you can do as a guy is feel totally helpless. It is a very specific thing to Edward. I definitely don’t like it when he passes the buck a little bit to Jacob. I always thought that was kind of giving up on her a little bit.”

Robert explained, “It is even more extreme in the book. He literally says to Jacob, you would be better with her. As soon as Bella gets pregnant with this thing, a matter that’s growing inside, it’s as if all the doubt and the self-loathing that he’s felt in all the other ones overwhelm him. He just cannot control himself. He can’t handle it all. He has to let go of his ego, his past and just rebuild himself. In the second part of the movie, he is basically a different person.”

As for their bonding, the down-to-earth Robert said, “It is really incredible that we did five movies and we are still the best of friends. Some people do movies together and start as friends. Then in the end, they are no longer friends. So to be able to share and go through this same experience with two other people is earth-shattering.”

Formerly a Manila journalist, Los Angeles-based Janet Susan R. Nepales is a member of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.

Source mb.com Via robstenation Via robpattinson Via Robsten Dreams

Rob Interview with Chicago Sun Times

Vampire love is not bloody easy.

Robert Pattinson — a.k.a. Edward Cullen in “Breaking Dawn — Part 1” — tells the Sun-Times that his big-screen honeymoon was met with nervous jitters.

From the groom.

“I felt such pressure when vampire Edward had to make love to his mortal wife Bella for the first time,” Pattinson says. “Let’s face it. The wedding is on the girl. The guy has to step up for the honeymoon.


“On the honeymoon, Edward insists they play a lot of chess to avoid … other things,” he says with a laugh. “I read that in the script and said, ‘Come on! Kristen looks so amazing in these little nighties. I don’t think chess is what’s on his mind.’ ”

Despite the real-life quandary of “are they or aren’t they dating,” Pattinson says it was “awkward to make love with all these expectations.

“After the first few takes, I was told to scale it back a bit. I guess I went a little bit too far,” he says with a giggle — and this guy giggles a lot in person.

“Breaking Dawn — Part 1” is the “Twilight” film with the wedding, honeymoon and then a half human-half vampire baby on board.

And there is the interference from Taylor Lautner’s Jacob Black, who still has a “thing” for Bella.

“Edward is a bit too open-minded,” Pattinson says. “I’d be like, ‘Don’t be an idiot.’ I’d get rid of this guy. I’d unleash on him — werewolf or not. Personally, I think your girlfriend or wife wants you to lose it and push away the other guy.

“Women like when you confirm ownership. Believe me, no one would dance with my girlfriend if he were her ex. Not happening on my watch.”

After acting a fictional vampire wedding, he isn’t sure he wants big nups of his own. “I did an interview with Kristen,” Pattinson says, “and she got annoyed with me for saying the groom’s role in a wedding is basically to be a prop.”

He has this advice for grooms: “Any guy who tries to get involved in organizing a wedding or even has an opinion is ridiculous.”

He did get very involved during Bella’s horrific birth scene.

“It’s so annoying that this is not an R-rated movie,” Pattinson laments.

“This could have been very ‘Rosemary’s Baby,’ ” he says. “I wanted a little demonic possession. Ideally, Bella would have twins. One good. One evil.”

He says the pivotal moment where Edward bites Bella and turns her into a vampire was movie magic. His first bites don’t work so well, so he chomps her in the neck, the leg, the arms …

“It would have been more fun if I were doing this to Kristen,” he says with a smile. “I was actually biting a rubber dummy of Kristen.


“I was really nervous because it had to be violent, but because it’s ‘Twilight,’ it also had to be a little dreamy. It was great because finally I get to be a vampire for a second and bite someone.”

He is happy to put these “Twilight” years in perspective.

“I came to L.A. at 17 totally unemployed,” he says. “ ‘Twilight’ was like being propelled by a jet through a maze. It still hasn’t slowed down. It’s fun. Totally bizarre. And someday I will figure it all out.


“I didn’t even know if I’d continue acting before this happened. Now, I do have a true drive and passion for it.”

Just not too much passion. The suits are watching.
Source suntimes Via Robsten Dreams


Kristen Interview with Chicago Sun Times


Seeming more relaxed than usual, Kristen Stewart admitted that after being in the intense media spotlight since she first stepped into the role of Bella Swan in the “Twilight” franchise, “I guess I’m feeling a bit more comfortable talking about the work.

“I’m still intensely private about my personal life, but I’ve come to realize people do become very interested in actors as people — especially when you’re lucky enough to be part of something as huge as ‘Twilight.’ ”

That said, Stewart did stress in a Sun-Times interview that she still will “ferociously fight to guard my privacy,” but she added with a sigh, “But I guess that is going to be on ongoing battle.”

Part of that “battle,” of course, is fending off the ongoing reports Stewart and co-star Robert Pattinson are a couple in real life — as well as on the big screen.

While Stewart would not talk about those rumors, she did respond directly when asked if there was anything that would surprise “Twilight” fans about Pattinson — or her other principal co-star, Taylor Lautner.

Laughing about the “Team Jacob” (Lautner) or “Team Edward” (Pattinson) debate among fans of both the Twilight books and the films, Stewart said, “I don’t know if there’s much that would surprise people about Rob, except that he’s probably more fun-loving in private than may come across in public.

“As for Taylor, I think people might be surprised to learn there are so many more layers to him. Yes, he’s a lot of fun and all that, but he’s a lot deeper than I think comes across in the media.”

“The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn — Part 1,” opening Friday, launches us into the two-part finale of the “Twilight” franchise — with the last movie being released next year.

“The biggest change for me in this film was that Bella finally gets to be happy — at least for a bit of time. While clearly she exhibits a lot of bridal jitters tied to the wedding scenes at the beginning of ‘Part 1,’ there’s some genuine joy there for both her and Edward.”

Both “Breaking Dawn” films were shot at once, so “we really had to keep focused over the six months we worked on this,” said Stewart. “In the morning we might film an intense scene from ‘Part 2,’ but then in the afternoon would be something more fun — but from ‘Part 1.’


“We really had to pay attention!”

Stewart loved getting to the part of author Stephenie Meyer’s saga where “Bella showcases so many different sides to her personality and her reality.


“There’s Bella the new bride, then there’s the pregnant Bella, the human Bella, the vampire Bella, it’s really a wild ride.

“But as an actress, it was all so rewarding,” said Stewart, who obviously loved being guided by director Bill Condon through these last two movies.

“He was amazing. I loved working with all of the directors of these films, but Bill is very special and I’m glad he was the one picked to wrap it all up. This was such a huge project, with shooting locations all over the world, amazing special effects and intense scenes to film — and he never once lost his cool.


“I don’t know how he did it.”

Another thing that Stewart enjoyed about filming “Breaking Dawn” was the constant presence of author Meyer, who had joined the project as a producer. “Previously, Stephenie would show up on occasion, but now she was there all the time, and it really helped.

“It made me realize how much I could have been helped by having her on the set for the first three films,” said Stewart. “Just seeing her there almost every day really gave all of us a boost and provided so much inspiration to everyone — the actors, the crew, everyone.”

Asked to weigh in which side of the “Team Jacob” or “Team Edward” side she’s on, she said, “Well, come on. After all, I do marry Edward and become a vampire. Don’t you think that answers that question?”

Source suntimes Via robpattinson Via Robsten Dreams

Rob Interview with Film Ink (Australia)

Currently starring in The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn: Part 1, Robert Pattinson is nearly ready to close the book on the franchise that made him famous.

You're a vampire veteran now? Typecast?
"Edward is such a specific character - a benevolent vampire. I just realised that my fly is undone! I forgot what I was talking about! Umm, I doubt if there's too many ‘nice vampire' scripts out there for me to get typecast."

We get to see you in a swimsuit in the latest film...
"I wear a onesie! I look like an inflatable frankfurter! So much of the books are about Edward's body, and I've managed to avoid taking my shirt off for the whole series, whereas in the book, it's almost every three pages."

The first three movies have been fairly chaste. What about the sex scenes in this?
"There aren't actually any sex scenes in the book. It's all in people's imaginations. That said, we do have to show something on screen, otherwise people will go insane. At the end of the day, watching other people have sex is never going to be that spectacular! It's a strange thing when there's so much hype about it; you're like, ‘God, I hope this lives up to it!'"

Edward and Bella become parents in this film. How do you prepare for fatherhood?
"It's very easy to react to holding a baby that's crying in your hands. You just end up being very careful with it. What's strange is that - two months after she's born - she can speak, and then she's eleven! You just go with it, and it's the ultimate fantasy...well, to some people...you can avoid all the annoying parts of having a kid!"

Like having a dog?!
"Exactly the same thing - you've just got to leave it alone and tell it to go to the toilet outside."

The birth scene sounds very gory?
"It seemed insanely graphic when we were doing it, but it's going to end up PG-13. It was horrible doing it, especially since we did it with a real baby covered in cream cheese and jello. What a horrible introduction to film! This baby is never going to be an actor ever."

Did you have a party - or perhaps a funeral - after the film was all done?
"Yeah, it was nice. On the last day in Canada, there were like 120 people on the last scene, and it was just stressful right up until the last second, and then in the Caribbean, it was just me and Kristen, and we hardly had anything to shoot, so everybody stayed and watched the sunrise."

Do you think that you'll still be as popular once The Twilight Saga is over?
"It's always good to have a bit of hype, but I'd be interested to see how people perceive me in a couple of years, because it seems like people have been talking about the same stuff about me for three years now. I'm wondering how long that will go on for..."

This is an excerpt from a feature in the upcoming December issue of FILMINK which is on sale November 16. For more from Robert Pattinson, be sure to pick up a copy!
Source filmink Via twitter Via Robsten Dreams


Rob and Kristen interviews with LoveFilm





Source lovefilm Via kstweartnews Via Robsten Dreams

Rob Interview with The Scotsman


Robert Pattinson is bewildered by just how famous he is. As the Twilight saga draws to a close, the actor, a curious mix of charm and awkwardness, offers a glimpse into his surreal world

“I was on the 209 bus last week,” I blurt to Robert Pattinson by way of an introduction. He looks wary. It’s fair enough. We’re in Los Angeles, in a room on the 10th floor of the Four Seasons hotel and the 209 is a bus that trundles through south west London. The reason I mention it is because it stops in Barnes, the leafy suburb where Pattinson grew up and where his parents still live. It’s a village, really, quaint and terribly English, peppered with ye olde pubs patronised by older gents in red socks and corduroys, the casual attire of the retired banker. It’s most definitely not Beverly Hills.

“That’s the bus that goes to where my parents live,” he says, looking confused. “And it’s the bus I took to my prep school in Sheen.”

I didn’t mention the 209 to freak Pattinson out, although I’m quickly learning how skittish he is. I wasn’t trying to be quirky, or to ingratiate myself; I was aiming to just say something ordinary, something simple and real, because it’s not difficult to work out that simple and real are not major features of Pattinson’s life. After all, he’s Edward Cullen, brooding vampire hero of the Twilight Saga, the cinematic juggernaut that started in 2008 and, with a release each year since, draws to a close with Breaking Dawn, the first part of which is out this month, followed by the second and final part, already shot but to be released in November 2012.

Before Twilight, Pattinson, 25, was anonymous. Now, there isn’t really anywhere he can go without being recognised. Pie shops in Yorkshire, karaoke bars in Texas – there’s no escape from Edward Cullen and the millions of fans who want their necks nibbled, mothers who’d like their daughters signed (really) or at the very least a photograph to put on Facebook.

It’s the reason Pattinson lives in hotels, to stay one step ahead.

“It’s good to be able to escape,” he says. “But I’ve started to feel recently that having a home would be good. You do kind of lose yourself when you’re living out of bags the whole time. But if I had a home I’d worry about it too much. And I hate spending money. If I could find a house for free that’d be amazing.”

He laughs and then looks serious again. It’s typical Pattinson delivery, a kind of subdued stream of consciousness in which he talks himself in and out of things, then relies on humour to lighten things up, not always convincingly.

“I rented a house in LA last year,” he says. “It was great for ages and then people found out about it and so there were people outside all the time. I had to go away for work and people were going up to it and taking pictures of themselves beside the house. People are crazy.”

You don’t really have to have seen any of the Twilight movies to know what they’re about. Based on Stephenie Meyer’s blockbuster novels, the movies tell the tale of the fated romance between Edward, a 110-year-old vampire who looks forever 17, and Bella (Kristen Stewart) who is human. The first three parts that have been released since 2008 have made nearly $2billion. They’ve also made Pattinson into a global star.

The hotel corridor is dotted with more women with clipboards than I can count. They stand in pairs, marking things down (what I wonder?). Outside the room in which I find Pattinson, sitting in a corner, looking as inconspicuous as a six foot movie star can possibly look, dressed down in jeans and Converse, with a scuzzy looking T-shirt underneath a canvas jacket, there are two burly security guards with inscrutable facial expressions and jackets that are slightly straining at the button.

“There are more organisers here than we have on the set,” Pattinson says. “Having security walking up and down the corridor as if something’s going to happen is freaking me out.”

It’s no wonder he’s nervous. He’s had some dicey experiences. The last time he was in London (promoting Water for Elephants, in which he starred with Reese Witherspoon) he was followed by one particular photographer for the whole week. It was odd, he says, and it got dangerous.

“In America there are loads of people who follow me around at the same time but this was just one guy who was just on me the whole time I was there. He was obsessed. I got in a taxi and he jumped off his motorbike and got in. He just opened the door and jumped in but he had a motorbike helmet on and I literally thought I was going to be assassinated.”

I check to see if he’s joking. He kind of is, but not entirely.

“It was the craziest thing, the weirdest thing that’s ever happened. And the cab driver just drove off because he was so freaked out as well. The guy fell out. It was like an action movie.”

It’s not hard to understand then why Pattinson is circumspect. You would be if you were the subject of an app called “Where’s Robert?”, which details your every move for fans to follow. But there’s something else too. In every interview Pattinson’s ever given, at least as much attention is focused on his meteoric rise to fame and all its trappings as the acting that actually got him there. It’s impossible not to dwell on it, partly because it’s so extreme and partly because he seems so bewildered by it, so genuinely uncomfortable and ill-suited to the whole thing.

The question is: how someone as self-conscious, awkward and self-deprecating has ended up starting his movie career in one massive movie franchise (Pattinson was Cedric Diggory in two Harry Potter films) and the leading man in another?

The way Pattinson tells it, it’s all been a bit of an accident. He started going along to Barnes Theatre Club because his dad told him he’d meet girls there. Then there was a stint as a model (his mum worked for a modelling agency) but he was “rubbish” and didn’t get any jobs. He was 17 when he landed the role of Diggory in The Goblet of Fire after having fallen asleep in the queue outside the audition room. (Being very relaxed seems to work for Pattinson. He took half a Valium before his audition for the first Twilight movie.) There was a slight blip after the Potter films when he landed a role in a play at the Royal Court but was fired before the opening night, but not long after Twilight came along and that was that.

There’s no doubt he feels lucky, if slightly incredulous, that things have worked out the way they have, but he reckons that having “fallen into” his career makes it harder for him to cope with all the scrutiny and attention that goes with his level of fame.

“At least if you’ve been striving for it your whole life then you’ve got that justification – this is what it is and this is what I’ve wanted. Maybe then you wouldn’t feel disillusioned with it. I guess the people who really work for it have this part of their persona which is just ready to go when they become famous. When they walk into a room and everyone turns round they’re like ‘yeah, they should be looking at me’. When I walk into a room and everyone turns round I feel exactly as I did before Twilight, which is like ‘what’s happening? This is weird.’ ”

But surely he must’ve wanted it a bit?

“I wanted something,” he says with a shrug.

Pattinson may be unsuited to being a heartthrob temperamentally, but when it comes to how he looks, it’s a different story. His cheekbones jut from his face in an almost unseemly way. Heavy brows give him a brooding intensity (his looks were described as Byronic by a producer of the first Twilight movie) and his mouth sits in a permanent, natural pout. Vanity Fair dubbed him the most handsome man in the world. How funny then that when Pattinson was announced as Edward Cullen, there was outrage. Fans of the books went crazy – they thought he was too ugly, “repulsive” they shrieked on internet fansites. Then he appeared, all pale and intense and they melted. Actually, that makes them sound a bit too passive. They didn’t melt as much as coalesce into a baying mob who couldn’t get enough of tragic, tortured Edward.

“I guess I got accepted, sort of,” he says squirming. “The reason people like it is because it’s in their imaginations. It means that the performances don’t really matter, it’s more about whether the face looks right. That warrants a certain degree of acceptance, even reluctant acceptance. It’s just a kind of brainwashing.” He laughs nervously.

Pattinson always has an explanation that deflects attention away from him. He takes modesty, ramps it up with inconsistent eye contact, an endless supply of self-effacing anecdotes and an air of utter bafflement that creates a genuine awkwardness. I don’t care about the £12million pay cheque (the amount he’s reportedly earned for the Twilight movies) it’s hard not to sympathise.

But not everyone does. Some people find the awkwardness off-putting. In a group or being interviewed on camera his body language is a study in self-consciousness, he folds himself up as if he’s trying to disappear. His chat can be similarly tricky. He sometimes laughs a little longer than he should and his stories have a tendency to peter out. One to one, he’s more relaxed, but it’s not easy.

And, of course, there’s also resentment. Either people are angered by the popularity of Twilight or they’re annoyed that someone could just stumble into a career like Pattinson’s. Earlier in the day, before I meet him one on one, I overhear a plump Italian journalist with Kevin Keegan curls demand of him, “What happened to your hair?”

It’s true, Pattinson’s hair was looking a bit odd, shaved on one side with long strands on the other. It looked homemade. But, still, the question was rude. And yet Pattinson’s reaction couldn’t have been more meek.

“It was for the last movie [Cosmopolis] I did,” he explained. “I had to have loads of bits randomly cut into so then I was going to shave my head and then I just shaved that bit and decided I kind of liked it.” He shrugged and laughed awkwardly. “I decided to just leave it.”

You’d think at some level Pattinson’s success might have made him a little big headed. In a way, it’s hard not to wish it had. Isn’t that at least part of what being a movie star is about – ego?

Pattinson says he was cockier before Twilight, when he could be who he wanted, say whatever he wanted because no one knew who he was.

“When no one knows who you are you can walk into a room and say anything. You can say you’re the greatest person in the world and no one can say you’re not because they don’t know you. But now they can say ‘I know you, why are you trying to be this? Why are you trying to be that?’ The best thing you can do is stay hidden.”

But how do you stay hidden from 30,000 fans who turn up to hear a 10-minute Q&A as they did at the Olympic Stadium in Munich? Or when you have to appear at Comic-Con and the queues are round the block? I wonder if he feels that people come to see him, or whether they want to see Edward?

“In some ways it helps to think that they’re coming to see Edward. But in other ways it’s saddening. It depends what mood I’m in. It’s a funny thing to see a crowd of people looking at you and knowing that they’re not actually seeing you at all, they’re just seeing whatever it is they imagine you to be.

“You can’t change. You can’t just suddenly decide to be different. I remember coming to LA before and I’d be a totally different person to who I was in London. I always used to look forward to coming over for three months of castings because I could just bullshit the whole time and feel really great about myself even though I wasn’t getting any jobs.” He laughs at the absurdity. “I got to meet all these really interesting people. But now, people have immediate preconceptions about me. I end up having the same conversation a lot. People assume there’s only one talking point.”

Suddenly you start to understand at least a part of the bond between Pattinson and his co-star Stewart: they’re Twilight survivors. Pattinson speaks about Stewart affectionately and he’s clearly full of admiration for her as an actor. Neither of them has ever said a word publicly about whether they are in a relationship despite endless speculation and photographs of them together all over the world. But why would they? Why would they give up something which, so far, they’ve managed to keep for themselves?

It’s a similar story with music. Pattinson is a talented musician and for a while he thought that music might be his career. He had a track on the first Twilight soundtrack. But ask him how it’s going now and he looks like he’d rather pull out his own teeth than talk about it.

“Erm, I’m just writing stuff. I don’t really know. It’s very easy to get labelled. I don’t really know how to go about the music stuff just now.”

Maybe his success as an actor has got in the way?

“Completely,” he says, looking sheepish. “For some reason everyone wants to shit on actors more than anyone else.”

To be fair, there can’t be much time for music. Since Pattinson finished shooting Breaking Dawn, he’s made Cosmopolis with David Cronenberg and Bel Ami, an adaptation of a Guy de Maupassant story of the same name, with Uma Thurman. Didn’t he want to have a break?

“The world moves so quickly now,” he says. “You’ve always got to have stuff lined up. Especially me. Anyone who got big in the last few years, the Twitter age, your shelf life is so short because people’s opinions change so quickly. You’ve got to give constant updates or announcements, even if the movie doesn’t exist, just to have something to announce.

“You’ve got to constantly change people’s perceptions. It’s like, ‘yeah, I’m playing a lesbian robot’ so that people don’t know what to think. If you leave it then it’s like ‘oh, it’s just that guy from Twilight’; it fossilises.”

But the problem for Pattinson is that with the work comes the promotion and even more attention and that’s when things get tricky. There’s no point fighting it, it’s just not his thing.

“The thing I’m most afraid of, because everything is pushing in that direction, is literally just making myself a product. As soon as you start doing Twitter and adverts and straying away what you started out doing and just being a personality, that’s when you get huge money but it’s also when you go crazy.”

Time’s up and to be honest, I almost feel relieved on Pattinson’s behalf. He’s survived another interview and now he can get on with trying to be invisible.

“I’ll think of you the next time I’m on the 209,” I tell him.

“You’ll probably see my mum,” he says. And laughs.

Source scotsman Via twitter Via robpattinson Via Robsten Dreams

A preiview of Robsten's Interview with Top Billing







Via Twitter Via Robsten Dreams

Rob's Interview with Paris Match


Google Translate thanks to Robsten Dreams

Miss, you ask too many questions, "gives me a number of guards deployed in the Four Seasons in Beverly Hills. One does not trifle with the safety of Robert Pattinson, 25, the most revered vampire the next century. I just had time to learn that superstar actor was transferred in secret from another palace in the City of Angels. Standing by the bodyguard, I expect to encounter the wonder of wonders, the teen unattractive to become the idol of millions + Teenagers from the saga "Twilight" and her romance with her partner on the screen and the city Kristen Stewart. This is somewhere, alone, behind closed doors of the corridor to receive following each his journalists. I do not see her. Did they sleep together? It is sin to ask this question! After four years of chastity, the sequel to "Twilight" ("Revelation, Part I") finally brings them together under the same sheets, in a scene to make adults blush.

But off screen, the junior pair income XXL ($ 28 million between them in 2010) plays the card of the sage duo. If they are seen exchanging not even a kiss in public, without their knowledge. So young and so serious! Here is Robert Pattinson who appears in the background. It is late: need a break and fuel - caffeinated soda and sweets - to take the shock of interviews, his martyrdom. Jean worn and greasy hair shaved in places, in battle elsewhere: the Londoner good family nonchalant sex appeal. Between the desire to rebel against the status of "new James Dean," he said usurped, and the pleasure of seduction, his heart balance. At her feet resting on the coffee table, Hollywood: the sign shining through the window under the rays of noon. Soon it may be in Cannes for the new Cronenberg ... He never thought we would take it so seriously. Kristen, she has always known she wants to be an actress, and great. It has character, the thin brown, smaller than him in a head and four years. He, too, but it is English. The knees drawn up toward the body, this great promising teenager does not want to play the VRP and comes out with its humor.

Paris Match. Nice haircut!
Robert Pattinson. Thank you ... [He passes his hand on his head, embarrassed.]

How did this happen?
It was on my last shoot, Cronenberg shot of Don DeLillo, "Cosmopolis." History, for short, a multimillionaire who runs through New York for a haircut ... I was them with scissors ratiboisés anarchic. I no longer looks like nothing, but I did not shave ... that's all! I would have to make me a ridge, I really look too trendy! Just kidding, punk style, it's canon, but I would not play it thoroughly.


After all, you do what you want: you are rich, beautiful and famous!
Are you kidding? Critics terrify me. It's like I see on the screen, I hate it! For example, I do not want to look at my records after each shot. I tend to fix my game to be more to my advantage, and there is no longer film, but the modeling! I prefer to say, "Whatever you do, you're great!" Everything is to be believed.

Not sure about you, is not it?
Oh, no ... well ... OK so I have to work on it.

Self-confidence is not it came with glory? Or is it an attitude?
This success has really taken aback. I wanted to be known, but I never imagined ending up in the life ... how to say ... an idol for young girls. Films for teenagers, it's not my thing. Not that it's my problem, it's just strange to see how the wheel turns.

What fate do you dream then? You hesitate between rapper and pen of a politician ...
I had invested seriously in the report, I saw a music producer. Then I played anti-hero: my roles of "Harry Potter" and "Twilight" were kind weird. I considered also that Edward [Cullen, the vampire he plays in the saga "Twilight"] was a little hilltop. Little did I know he would become so public. I had my dose of romantic characters.

You tried your luck in the modeling, without much success.
I did it for the money. At 14, I was selling newspapers. On the advice of my mother, who worked at a modeling agency, I landed in this environment where we won 600 euros in one day ... In the beginning, which broke out! I was surrounded by beautiful girls, I felt like getting paid to do nothing. Then I ran tons of castings, and harvested twenty refusal for a yes, making me throw on a simple "Hmmmm, no." But the hearings also, I had planted me a thousand times before reaching a result.
"In college, I was just jealous of those who had the guts to go on stage. My real engine, jealousy "

Tired, you almost give up your acting career, just before landing "Twilight" in 2007.
After "Harry Potter", I was rowing, I had the feeling of wasting my time. I went to Los Angeles because I had one more round, and I felt guilty of having obtained any role in America. In four years, Hollywood never wanted me. Normally, after a failure as stinging, your agent lets you down. For some reason, I kept mine. I felt good this time. I was going to play a guitar, it would be cool. But I did the worst audition of my life. Disgusted, I almost did not go to visit the last chance the next day ... It was for "Twilight".

You shot a short film in Britain, and you spend your time between shots, playing the guitar. As before, when you were doing the "horse" in bars. Will you finally sign an album?
I'd love to. I will do it with my friends. But it's hard to get everyone together, and the songs I wrote began to date. To compose new, I would need six months off. I did not.

Are you afraid that the project staff are stamped "CD of the star of 'Twilight'?"
So, too. It's annoying and embarrassing. More importantly, as I am not into the water, I can maintain the myth of Pattinson, the great musician!

Fame Can you destroy?
When you're famous, we sometimes feel very isolated. A force to be observed under the microscope in all its flaws, it collapses.

You've experienced it yourself?
Yes. [He sighs and stands up.] But I have built an alter ego: all these strangers do not talk about me, but that other ... I'm missing.

Are your parents for something in your decision to become an actor?
My father, a vintage car salesman, said it would be fun. Like mother, it has always been an artist full of imagination, but were afraid to come out of her closet. When I was a kid, he went down behind closed doors in the living room at 4 am, Elvis sing in a low voice with my karaoke! But my parents never put pressure me. I cried a lot in their lap, cried out that I hated my job. Their answer was invariably: "Resign if it does not make you happy." You lose the right if your parents say, "All is well, my boy. Go on, you'll end up with the-success. "

You are a great shy. Have you done this job to fight this trait?
Yes. I started in the background: I worked from light to acting classes at the college. But by seeing all the boys to become popular by playing on stage, I wanted the same thing. "I can do better than these guys," I said to myself.

So you chose the film to become a sex symbol?
No, I was just jealous of those who had the guts to go on stage. Jealousy, that's my real engine. In music, too. I often went to see my best friend playing in blues rooms. I see myself still tell his father: "The cow, I'd love to do what he does!" And he answer me: "You know, there are those who can do it, and others." Stomp! Two years later, I had my little concerts, too. Since then, he does not go one day without my thinking about music.

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